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Fluoride therapy

January 19, 2020

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 3:41 am

Fluoride therapy is the delivery of fluoride to the teeth topically or systemically, which is designed to prevent tooth decay (dental caries) which results in cavities. Most commonly, fluoride is applied topically to the teeth using gels, varnishes, toothpaste/dentifrices or mouth rinse.

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Systemic delivery involves fluoride supplementation using tablets or drops which are swallowed. This type of delivery is rarely used where public water supplies are fluoridated, but is common (along with salt fluoridation) in some European countries.

Benefits of fluoride therapy
Fluoride therapy is commonly practiced and generally agreed upon as being useful in the modern dental field. Fluoride combats the formation of tooth decay primarily in three ways:

Fluoride promotes the remineralization of teeth, by enhancing the tooth remineralization process. Fluoride found in saliva will absorb into the surface of a tooth where demineralization has occurred. The presence of this fluoride in turn attracts other minerals (such as calcium), thus resulting in the formation of new tooth mineral.
Fluoride can make a tooth more resistant to the formation of tooth decay. The new tooth mineral that is created by the remineralization process in the presence of fluoride is actually a “harder” mineral compound than existed when the tooth initially formed. Teeth are generally composed of hydroxyapatite and carbonated hydroxyapatite. Fluorapatite is created during the remineralization process when fluoride is present and is more resistant to dissolution by acids (demineralization).
Fluoride can inhibit oral bacteria’s ability to create acids. Fluoride decreases the rate at which the bacteria that live in dental plaque can produce acid by disrupting the bacteria and its ability to metabolize sugars. The less sugar the bacteria can consume, the less acidic waste which will be produced and participate in the demineralization process.
There are many different types of fluoride therapies, which include at home therapies and professionally applied topical fluorides (PATF). At home therapies can be further divided into over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription strengths. The fluoride therapies whether OTC or PATF are categorized by application – dentifrices, mouth rinses, gels/ foams, varnishes, dietary fluoridate supplements, and water fluoridation.

Fluoride, while beneficial to adults, is more important in children whose teeth are developing. As teeth are developing within their jaw bones, enamel is being laid down. Systemic ingestion of fluoride results in a greater component of fluoroapatite in the mineral structure of the enamel.

Methods of delivery

Dentifrices
Most dentifrices today contain 0.1% (1000 ppm) fluoride, usually in the form of sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP); 100 g of toothpaste containing 0.76 g MFP (equivalent to 0.1 g fluoride). Toothpaste containing 1,500 ppm fluoride has been reported to be slightly more efficacious in reducing dental caries in the U.S. Toothpaste may cause or exacerbate perioral dermatitis most likely caused by sodium lauryl sulfate, an ingredient in toothpaste. It is suspected that SLS is linked to a number of skin issues such as dermatitis and it is commonly used in research laboratories as the standard skin irritant with which other substances are compared.

Prescription strength fluoride toothpaste generally contains 1.1% (4,950 ppm) sodium fluoride toothpaste, e.g. PreviDent 5000 Plus or booster. This type of toothpaste is used in the same manner as regular toothpaste. It is well established that 1.1% sodium fluoride is safe and effective as a caries preventive. This prescription dental cream is used once daily in place of regular toothpaste.

Mouth rinses
The most common fluoride compound used in mouth rinse is sodium fluoride. Over-the-counter solutions of 0.05% sodium fluoride (225 ppm fluoride) for daily rinsing are available for use. Fluoride at this concentration is not strong enough for people at high risk for caries.

Prescription mouth rinses are more effective for those at high risk for caries, but are usually counter-indicated for children, especially in areas with fluoridated drinking water. However, in areas without fluoridated drinking water, these rinses are sometimes prescribed for children.

Gels/foams
Gels and foams are used for patients who are at high risk for caries, orthodontic patients, patients undergoing head and neck radiation, patients with decreased salivary flow, and children whose permanent molars should, but cannot, be sealed.

GC Tooth Mousse, invented by Dr Eric Reynolds, Head of the School of Dental Science at Melbourne University, at the Royal Dental Hospital Melbourne is now considered an essential management solution for at risk patients.

The gel or foam is applied through the use of a mouth tray, which contains the product. The tray is held in the mouth by biting. Application generally takes about four minutes, and patients should not rinse, eat, smoke, or drink for at least 30 minutes after application.

Some gels are made for home application, and are used in a manner similar to toothpaste. The concentration of fluoride in these gels is much lower than professional products.

Varnish
Fluoride varnish has practical advantages over gels in ease of application, a non-offensive taste, and use of smaller amounts of fluoride than required for gel applications. Varnish is intended for the same group of patients as the gels and foams. There is also no published evidence as of yet that indicates that professionally applied fluoride varnish is a risk factor for enamel fluorosis. The varnish is applied with a brush and sets within seconds.

Cosmetic Dentistry

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 3:19 am

Cosmetic Dentistry is continually evolving, and with a variety of advanced treatment options, achieving a beautiful, healthy, aesthetic smile is made easy for patients of all ages. Your smile is one of your most important features.

cosmetic dentistry

Are you ready for a smile makeover?

If you’re considering cosmetic dental treatment, ask yourself a few simple questions:

  • Do you hesitate when you smile?
  • Would you like to increase your self-confidence?
  • Do you want to look your best in social or professional situations?
  • Are you ready to reverse any dental imperfections you may have?

If you’ve answered yes to any of these questions, cosmetic dentistry may be the answer you’ve been looking for!

Cosmetic Dentistry is an Art and a Science

Let us help you achieve your smile goals! Cosmetic dentistry is both an art and science. By providing cosmetic dental care, our dentist is able to offer smile enhancement, restoration, and maintenance treatments for optimal dental health. Using cutting-edge techniques and advanced materials, our office proudly offers you a beautiful, natural smile and all the benefits that come with it.

Feel more confident about your appearance with a new smile that is as beautiful as it is healthy. You no longer have to suffer from missing, chipped, discolored, or crooked teeth. Contact our practice today and schedule your smile analysis and makeover!

Tooth Whitening Treatments

January 18, 2020

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 3:39 am

What should you ask your dentist about tooth whitening?

Tooth Whitening

You may want to start by speaking with your dentist about tooth whitening. Our dentists can tell you whether tooth whitening procedures would be effective for you. Whiteners may not correct all types of discoloration. For example, yellow-ish hued teeth will probably bleach well, brownish-colored teeth may bleach less well, and grayish-hued teeth may not bleach well at all. Likewise, bleaching may not enhance your smile if you have had bonding or tooth-colored fillings placed in your front teeth. The whitener will not effect the color of these materials, and they will stand out in your newly whitened smile. In these cases, you may want to investigate other options, like porcelain veneers or dental bonding.

What is in-office bleaching?

If you are a candidate for bleaching, your dentist may suggest a procedure that can be done in his or her office. This procedure is called chairside bleaching and may require more than one office visit. Each visit may take from 30 minutes to one hour.

During chairside bleaching, the dentist will apply either a protective gel to your gums or a rubber shield to protect the oral soft tissues. A bleaching agent is then applied to the teeth, and a special light may be used to enhance the action of the agent.

A number of in-office bleaching agents have the ADA Seal of Acceptance, your assurance that they have met ADA standards of safety and effectiveness.

Lasers have been used during tooth whitening procedures to enhance the action of the tooth whitening agent. No tooth whitening products using lasers currently are on the ADA list of Accepted products.

What are at-home procedures and products?

There are several types of products available for use at home, which can either be dispensed by your dentist or purchased over-the-counter.

Bleaching solutions. These products contain peroxide(s), which actually bleach the tooth enamel. These products typically rely on percent carbamide peroxide as the bleaching agent, carbamide peroxide comes in several different concentrations (10%, 16%, 22%).

Peroxide-containing whiteners typically come in a gel and are placed in a mouthguard. Usage regimens vary. Some products are used for about twice a day for 2 weeks, and others are intended for overnight use for 1-2 weeks. If you obtain the bleaching solution from your dentist, he or she can make a custom-fitted mouthguard for you that will fit your teeth precisely. Currently, only dentist-dispensed home-use 10% carbamide peroxide tray-applied gels carry the ADA Seal.

You also may want to speak with your dentist should any side effects become bothersome. For example, teeth can become sensitive during the period when you are using the bleaching solution. In many cases, this sensitivity is temporary and should lessen once the treatment is finished. Some people also experience soft tissue irritation-either from a tray that doesn’t fit properly or from solution that may come in contact with the tissues. If you have concerns about such side effects, you should discuss them with your dentist.

Toothpastes. All toothpastes help remove surface stain through the action of mild abrasives.

“Whitening” toothpastes in the ADA Seal of Acceptance program have special chemical or polishing agents that provide additional stain removal effectiveness. Unlike bleaches, these ADA Accepted products do not alter the intrinsic color of teeth.

How should I choose a whitening product?

When selecting a tooth whitening or any dental product, be sure to look for the ADA Seal of Acceptance-your assurance that they have met ADA standards of safety and effectiveness.

Bad Breath

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 1:02 am

Everybody has bad breath from time to time, especially first thing in the morning. You also may have bad breath when you are hungry, when you are dieting, or after eating foods with a strong odor, such as garlic, onions, or pastrami.

bad breath

Many things can cause bad breath. A major cause is decreased saliva. Saliva has a cleaning action that helps reduce or eliminate bad breath. When saliva decreases, bacteria can grow, causing bad breath.

Bad breath caused by a decrease in saliva may be especially noticeable:

  • In the morning. The flow of saliva almost stops during sleep. The reduced cleaning action of the saliva allows bacteria to grow, causing bad breath.
  • When you are hungry. Bad breath is more common in people who miss meals or are dieting. Chewing food increases saliva in the mouth. When you are not eating, saliva decreases and bacteria growth increases, causing bad breath.
  • When you are dehydrated. When you become dehydrated, you do not produce as much saliva. The reduced cleaning action of the saliva allows bacteria to grow, causing bad breath.
  • From diseases that affect the salivary glands, such as Sjögren’s syndrome or scleroderma.
  • When you are taking certain medicines.
  • After drinking alcoholic beverages.

Other causes of bad or changed breath include:

  • Eating foods with a strong odor, such as garlic, onions, or pastrami.
  • Smoking or using smokeless (spit) tobacco, such as snuff or chewing tobacco.
  • Bacteria and plaque buildup in the mouth from food caught between teeth, dentures, or dental appliances.

Mouth and throat problems that can cause mouth odor include:

  • Throat or mouth infections, such as strep throat.
  • Dental problems, such as cavities.
  • Gum disease (periodontal disease), which may cause a metallic breath odor.
  • Tonsils with deep tunnels (crypts) that trap food particles.
  • Throat or mouth cancers.

Problems in other areas of the body that can cause mouth odor include:

  • Problems with the nose, such as a sinus infection, nasal polyps, or an object in the nose.
  • Diabetes. A symptom of very high blood sugar is a strong, fruity breath odor (similar to nail polish remover or acetone).
  • Digestive system disorders, such as reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease), bowel problems, or cancer.
  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.
  • Liver disease.
  • Lung problems, such as an infection or cancer.

To help improve your breath:

  • Gargle with water.
  • Brush your teeth, tongue, roof of your mouth, and gums at least twice a day with toothpaste.
  • Floss your teeth once each day.
  • Eat a low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables.
  • Eat less meat.
  • Do not smoke or use other tobacco products, such as snuff or chewing (spit) tobacco.
  • Avoid foods and drinks that cause bad breath, such as garlic and alcohol.
  • Eat at regular intervals. Dieting or missing meals can decrease saliva and cause bad breath.
  • Chew sugar-free gum, suck on sugar-free mints, or drink water, especially if your mouth is dry. Try using breath sticks, which contain the ingredients found in a mouthwash and dissolve in your mouth.
  • Remove dentures, removable bridges, partial plates, or orthodontic appliances and clean them once each day or as directed by your dentist. Pieces of food and germs can collect on these appliances and cause bad breath.
  • Use a mouthwash for temporary relief of bad breath. Swish it around in your mouth for 30 seconds before spitting it out.
  • Have regular dental checkups.
  • Make an appointment to see an ear, nose, and throat specialist (otolaryngologist) if you have frequent problems with mouth odor.

Teeth Home Care

January 17, 2020

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 2:06 am

Your teeth, smile and oral health is an important part of who you are.  A beautiful, healthy smile that lasts a lifetime is our ultimate goal when treating patients.  Your personal teeth home care plays an important role in achieving that goal.  Your personal teeth home care starts by eating balanced meals, reducing the number of snacks you eat, and correctly using the various dental aids that help control the plaque and bacteria that cause dental disease.

teeth

Tooth brushing – Brush your teeth at least twice a day (especially before going to bed at night) with an ADA approved soft bristle brush and toothpaste.

  1. Place the brush at a 45 degree angle to the gums and gently brush using a small, circular motion, ensuring that you always feel the bristles on the gums.
  2. Brush the outer, inner, and biting surfaces of each tooth.
  3. Use the tip of the brush to clean the inside of the front teeth.
  4. Brush your tongue to remove bacteria and freshen your breath.

Electric toothbrushes are also recommended.  They are easy to use and can remove plaque efficiently.  Simply place the bristles of the electric brush on your gums and teeth and allow the brush to do its job, several teeth at a time.

teeth

Flossing – Daily flossing is the best way to clean between the teeth and under the gumline.  Flossing not only helps clean these spaces, it disrupts plaque colonies from building up, preventing damage to the gums, teeth, and bone.

  1. Take 12-16 inches (30-40cm) of dental floss and wrap it around your middle fingers, leaving about 2 inches (5cm) of floss between the hands.
  2. Using your thumbs and forefingers to guide the floss, gently insert the floss between teeth using a sawing motion.
  3. Curve the floss into a “C” shape around each tooth and under the gumline.  Gently move the floss up and down, cleaning the side of each tooth.

Floss holders are recommended if you have difficulty using conventional floss.

Fotolia-43464614-X-c-r

Rinsing – It is important to rinse your mouth with water after brushing, and also after meals if you are unable to brush.  If you are using an over-the-counter product for rinsing, it’s a good idea to consult with your dentist or dental hygienist on its appropriateness for you.

Use other dental aids as recommended by your dentist or dental hygienist: Interdental brushes, rubber tip stimulators, tongue cleaners, irrigation devices, fluoride, medicated rinses, etc., can all play a role in good dental home care.

Oral Cancer

January 16, 2020

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 12:58 am

The term oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and the pharynx, part of the throat. About two-thirds of oral cancers occur in the mouth and about one-third are found in the pharynx.

Oral cancer will be diagnosed in an estimated 28,000 Americans this year and will cause approximately 7,000 deaths. It is the 6th most common cancer in men and the 14th most common cancer in women.

Oral cancer can spread quickly. On average, 59 percent of those with the disease will survive more than five years.

Oral cancer most often occurs in people over the age of 40 and affects twice as many men as women.

oral cancer

Lower Your Risk

Most oral cancer is preventable. 75 percent of oral cancers are related to tobacco use, alcohol use, or use of both substances together. Using both tobacco and alcohol puts you at much greater risk than using either substance alone.

Do not use tobacco products – cigarettes, chew or snuff, pipes or cigars. Tobacco in all forms plays a role in oral cancers.

If you drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. Excessive alcohol use can increase your risk of oral cancer.

Use lip balm that contains sunscreen. Exposure to sunlight is a risk factor for lip cancer.

Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Eating lots of fruits and vegetables as part of a low-fat, high fiber diet may help reduce cancer risk. The National Cancer Institute suggests eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

Possible Signs & Symptoms

See a dentist or physician if any of the following symptoms lasts for more than two weeks.

  •  A sore, irritation, lump or thick patch in your mouth, lip, or throat
  •  A white or red patch in your mouth
  •  A feeling that something is caught in your throat
  •  Difficulty chewing or swallowing
  •  Difficulty moving your jaw or tongue
  •  Numbness in your tongue or other areas of your mouth
  •  Swelling of your jaw that causes dentures to fit poorly or become uncomfortable
  •  Pain in one ear without hearing loss

Early Detection

It is important to find oral cancer as early as possible when it can be treated more successfully.

An oral cancer examination can detect early signs of cancer. Oral cancer exams are painless and quick – and take only a few minutes.

Your regular dental check-up is an excellent opportunity to have the exam. During the exam, your dentist or dental hygienist will check your face, neck, lips, and entire mouth for possible signs of cancer.

Some parts of the pharynx are not visible during an oral cancer exam. Talk to your dentist about whether a specialist should check your pharynx.

Tooth Whitening

January 15, 2020

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 5:10 am

teeth-whitening-before-after

Many factors, including dietary habits (drinking coffee, tea, soda, and red wine) and certain medications, affect the whiteness of your smile. Tooth whitening is an affordable and effective way to combat common causes of tooth discoloration while boosting your self-confidence and improving your appearance.

We offer a wide range of tooth whitening products designed to brighten your smile. With custom designed take home, on-the-go, and in-office options, Tooth Whitening Systems accommodate all lifestyles and budgets.

Prescription-strength Tooth Whitening Systems are stronger and more effective than over-the-counter teeth whitening products, and are only available through your dentist.

Get more confidence in your smile with Tooth Whitening System

Safe

Take Home Whitening Gels are only available through your dentist. While using the Tooth Whitening System, your dentist will supervise your treatment from initial consultation through completion. The special whitening gel will not affect your gums, and in many cases can help improve your oral health by strengthening tooth enamel, decreasing sensitivity, and offering increased cavity prevention.

Effective

Powerful, prescription-strength Take Home Whitening Gels are available in varying strengths depending on your dental needs. Take Home Whitening Gels can provide results after just one night, although results may vary and can take up to a week before you experience noticeable changes.

Customized

Take Home Whitening Gels are delivered through customized bleaching trays designed to fit your unique smile. Your dentist will create your personal trays from an alginate impression of your mouth; this customization is part of what makes Take Home Whitening Gels so effective.

PLAQUE: What it is and how to get rid of it

January 14, 2020

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 10:04 pm

Plaque can be hard to see and it can cause a lot of harm to your gums and teeth.

HINTON, EDSON, JASPER, GRANDE CACHE, ALBERTA -

People used to think that as you got older you naturally lost your teeth. We now know that’s not true. By following easy steps for keeping your teeth and gums healthy, plus seeing your dentist regularly, you can have your teeth for a lifetime!

Plaque: What is it?

Plaque is made up of invisible masses of harmful germs that live in the mouth and stick to the teeth.

  • Some types of plaque cause tooth decay.
  • Other types of plaque cause gum disease.

Red, puffy or bleeding gums can be the first signs of gum disease. If gum disease is not treated, the tissues holding the teeth in place are destroyed and the teeth are eventually lost.

Dental plaque is difficult to see unless it’s stained. You can stain plaque by chewing red “disclosing tablets,” found at grocery stores and drug stores, or by using a cotton swab to smear green food coloring on your teeth. The red or green color left on the teeth will show you where there is still plaque-and where you have to brush again to remove it.

Stain and examine your teeth regularly to make sure you are removing all plaque. Ask your dentist or dental hygienist if your plaque removal techniques are o.k.

Step one

Floss

Use floss to remove germs and food particles between teeth. Rinse.

NOTE! Ease the floss into place gently. Do not snap it into place-this could harm your gums.

Step two

Brush Teeth

Use any tooth brushing method that is comfortable, but do not scrub hard back and forth. Small circular motions and short back and forth motions work well. Rinse.

To prevent decay, it’s what’s on the toothbrush that counts. Use fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride is what protects teeth from decay.

Brush the tongue for a fresh feeling! Rinse again.

Remember: Food residues, especially sweets, provide nutrients for the germs that cause tooth decay, as well as those that cause gum disease. That’s why it is important to remove all food residues, as well as plaque, from teeth. Remove plaque at least once a day, twice a day is better. If you brush and floss once daily, do it before going to bed.

7 habits to form for healthy teeth and gums

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 4:58 pm

It’s true, you can keep your teeth healthy throughout your lifetime. Here’s how.

healthy

1. Skip soda

  • Fizzy drinks attack your teeth two ways: all that sugar and strong acids that erode the protective enamel on your teeth.
  • The worst ones for your mouth are non-colas, which contain more citric acid, and diet sodas, which may contain phosphoric acid and citric acid.
  • Sip water or unsweetened iced tea.
  • Tea may help guard against gum disease.

2. Investigate colour changes

  • Sometimes darkening teeth can signal more than a cosmetic problem.
  • Big cavities, periodontal disease, some oral cancers and some medications can cause staining or darkening of the teeth.
  • Whitening treatments are most effective for teeth that have become discoloured due to yellowing from age, tobacco, red wine, coffee or tea.

3. Chew xylitol-sweetened gum

  • Xylitol, a sugar alcohol made from substances found in birch trees and other woods, may help lower levels of cavity-producing acid.
  • Even if xylitol levels are low, they may help somewhat.
  • Sugar-free gum can also help remove bits of food stuck deep in crevices on the chewing surfaces of your teeth.

4. Treat bleeding gums seriously

You shouldn’t live with gums that bleed every time you brush or floss. If this is happening to you, first make sure you’re faithfully brushing and flossing. Then, add an anti-gingivitis mouthwash. If bleeding persists, schedule a dental appointment.

5. Watch for signs of gum disease

You may have gum disease if you have any of the following symptoms. If you do, call your dentist.

  • Red, swollen, or tender gums
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Pus between the teeth and gums
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • A change in the way the teeth fit together
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures

6. Schedule regular dental cleanings and checkups

Your smile will be whiter in pictures, and you’ll cut your odds of developing gum disease in two ways:

  1. Professional cleanings remove calculus — hardened plaque that can make gums recede — even better than brushing and flossing.
  2. Your dentist will have a chance to check for signs of gum disease.

Schedule appointments even if you have partial dentures, a bridge, dental implants, or a full set of dentures. Your dentist will check your mouth for signs of oral cancer and other problems.

Most Canadians believe their oral health is great, yet they also believe that tooth loss was inevitable with age. But, with the right steps, you can keep your teeth and gums healthy for your entire life.  Think about it, you use your teeth on a daily bases to smile, talk and chew food. Your teeth are important!

Why Choose A Dental Implant?

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 2:41 am

Tooth loss and dental implant

 

If you have lost one or more teeth, as millions of people have, you may be quite familiar with the unpleasant consequences. It affects your ability to chew, and can limit your dietary options. It can impact your appearance, along with your social and professional life. And the related pain and inconvenience can limit your lifestyle.

Conventional dentistry provides replacements for missing teeth using bridges, removable partial dentures or full dentures. However, each of these treatment options can cause a new set of potential problems.

Partial dentures and full dentures are unnatural, and are difficult to attach securely, making them likely to slip or even fall out. They are often uncomfortable and can be very unstable, resulting in difficulty with speech and eating. All of these effects can lead to a lack of confidence and a desire to avoid many activities and social situations. In addition, none of these traditional solutions address the problem of bone loss.

implant

Advantages of Dental Implants

 

A dental implant can be used to replace a single tooth, a few teeth or all the teeth on one or both arches of your mouth. Whether you’re replacing a single tooth or multiple teeth, dental implants have numerous advantages:

  • Implants are fixed in place and do not move. Therefore, there is no slipping or clicking as with dentures.
  • Implant-supported teeth are the closest thing possible to natural teeth. They look, feel and function just like your natural teeth.
  • Dental implants allow you to eat all the foods you like, just as with natural teeth.
  • Dental implants have proven to be reliable, with a 95% or higher success rate. The success of dental implants is supported by decades of clinical experience and hundreds of thousands of satisfied patients.
  • Dental implants and your new teeth can be placed without impacting other healthy teeth. This is not true with traditional bridges, which require filing down of healthy adjacent teeth to support the bridge. These filed down teeth often fail, requiring more and expensive dental work.
  • Unlike bridges or dentures, dental implants are placed into and fuse with the bone in your jaws. This not only provides stability, but also prevents bone loss and atrophy that normally results from missing teeth.
  • Dental implants provide a long-term solution to your dental problems, often lasting a lifetime. Traditional bridges usually must be replaced, often within few years.
  • With dental implants, you avoid the potential pain and embarrassment of dentures. There is no fear of slipping or falling out, no need to avoid activities, no need to restrict what or how you eat, no wire in your mouth, no plastic on the roof of your mouth. Many people with dental implants say they just live better than they did when they had dentures.

Implants prevent bone deterioration

Implant

Natural teeth preserve the jawbone in which they grow. When a tooth is lost, the bone around the missing tooth begins to deteriorate. The process is called atrophy, or bone loss. Over time, this can lead in the loss of other teeth, and the overall deterioration of your dental health.

When many or all your teeth are missing, your jawbone can deteriorate significantly, resulting in a facial features that look “sunken.” People with dentures often look older and less attractive because of this bone loss. Conventional bridges and dentures do not prevent the problem of loss of bone in the area where teeth are missing.

Dental implants help prevent the problems of bone loss by promoting healthy bone in your jaw. Dental implants are anchored into the jawbone and do not rely on surrounding teeth, so they act much like natural teeth. When a missing tooth is replaced by a dental implant, the fusion (or osseointegration) of the implant and bone provides stability, just as the natural tooth did. When missing all of your teeth, dental implants stimulate the bone, protect against atrophy and help preserve your natural facial features.

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#20 - 4 Spruce Ridge Drive, Spruce Grove, AB T7X 4S3 CA
Dr. Mark Southwood Spruce Grove, AB dentist. (780) 962-5538 (780) 962-4485 spruceridgedental@hotmail.ca