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Spruce Ridge Dental Blog

How to ease your child’s anxiety about going to the dentist

May 24, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 12:24 am

It’s no secret the dentist may be up there with your child’s biggest fears. Between all of the poking and prodding, a simple check-up can feel uncomfortable. Here’s a handy guide to ensure your child faces a dental exam with confidence.

dentist

Stay calm

  • Hide your own dental fears. Your child will pick up on them if you don’t.
  • Perhaps have a partner or another family member, like an aunt, accompany the child.
  • Talk to your child about what the dentist will do and why. Keep the messaging positive and realistic. Hold their hand if you’re able to.

Entertain them

  • A child-friendly dental office will have plenty of distractions for them in the waiting room and while they’re in the chair.
  • You too can distract them if necessary, with a favourite book or toy, perhaps. Answer all their questions if they are unable to focus on a book or toy.
  • A simple light and positive conversation should do the trick.

Prepare them physically

  • No child is at their best when he or she is tired. Make sure they are well rested, and they will handle the experience better.
  • Make sure they are hydrated, too. If they have a tendency to become queasy or gag, ensure they have a healthy and light lunch about an hour beforehand.

Rewards go a long way

  • Plan to do something fun after the dental appointment. Give your child something to look forward to.
  • It doesn’t have to be an extravagant reward, just something that suggests they got through the appointment like a champ.

And there you have it: With these tips, your next trip to the dentist with your child should be a breeze.

Dental Implants For Missing Teeth

May 23, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 12:12 am

Dental implants are a great solution for people who have missing teeth. When done correctly, they look and function just like natural teeth. But having missing teeth doesn’t automatically qualify someone for implants. There are a certain factors that make dental implants successful and long lasting. To receive dental implants, a person needs to be in fairly good health. That means that your kidney, lungs, and liver are all adequate to undergo oral surgery. If diabetes or high blood pressure is a problem, it can be controlled with a patient’s physician. Additionally, healthy gums and enough bone in the jaw to support the implant are important. A bone graft can be done prior to implants if that is a problem.

 

dental Implants
Dental implants are a great solution for people who have missing teeth. When done correctly, they look and function just like natural teeth.

Adults, seniors, or late teens can all be good candidates for dental implants. Although, young children and early teens are not advised to get implants since they are still in a developing stage. Women who are pregnant should wait to get implants as well because the body’s chemistry is changing during pregnancy.

It is vital to make a consultation appointment with a qualified dentist. Your oral health needs to be fully examined along with a review of your medical history so any issues can be addressed.

What are Dental Implants?

May 22, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 1:07 am

Dental implants have become a treatment of choice to replace missing teeth, as well as for people with failing teeth or severe periodontal disease.  True tooth replacement has been a goal of dentistry since its inception, but only recently has dental technology evolved to make it possible.

Dental implants
Losing a tooth, particularly a front tooth, can be a traumatic experience. It can have a profound effect, not only on our ability to eat normally, but on our self-esteem and confidence. With dental implants, you no longer have to be held back in your social and professional life.
Dental implants look and perform like natural teeth in virtually every way — they are rooted in the bone like natural teeth, and they require no adhesives or creams like dentures do. More importantly, the use of dental implants does not impact your other healthy teeth. Unlike dentures or bridges, dental implants are stable, and can last a lifetime.

Dental implants
How Dental Implants Work

The design of a dental implant is based on the structure of a natural tooth. A natural tooth is one piece commonly described as having two main parts: the crown, which sits above the gums, and the root, which sits securely in your jawbone.

Dental implants
A dental implant treatment may involve several pieces, but it also consists primarily of two parts. One part is a restoration, which is custom fabricated to match the shape of a natural tooth crown. The second part is the implant, which replaces the function of a natural tooth root. Implants are made of titanium or titanium alloy, a metal that fuses with bone to form a strong, permanent bond called osseointegration.
In the first phase of the implant process, a screw-like implant is surgically placed into the jaw and allowed to heal. Once the implant is secure, a post or abutment is attached to the implant, onto which a custom restoration is placed. The entire process can take from two to seven months.

True tooth replacement has been a goal of dentistry since its inception, but only recently has dental technology evolved to make it possible. Dental implants have become a treatment of choice to replace missing teeth, as well as for people with failing teeth or severe periodontal disease.

Dental implants
Losing a tooth, particularly a front tooth, can be a traumatic experience. It can have a profound effect, not only on our ability to eat normally, but on our self-esteem and confidence. With dental implants, you no longer have to be held back in your social and professional life.
Dental implants look and perform like natural teeth in virtually every way — they are rooted in the bone like natural teeth, and they require no adhesives or creams like dentures do. More importantly, the use of dental implants does not impact your other healthy teeth. Unlike dentures or bridges, dental implants are stable, and can last a lifetime.

How Dental Implants Work

The design of a dental implant is based on the structure of a natural tooth. A natural tooth is one piece commonly described as having two main parts: the crown, which sits above the gums, and the root, which sits securely in your jawbone.
A dental implant treatment may involve several pieces, but it also consists primarily of two parts. One part is a restoration, which is custom fabricated to match the shape of a natural tooth crown. The second part is the implant, which replaces the function of a natural tooth root. Implants are made of titanium or titanium alloy, a metal that fuses with bone to form a strong, permanent bond called osseointegration.
In the first phase of the implant process, a screw-like implant is surgically placed into the jaw and allowed to heal. Once the implant is secure, a post or abutment is attached to the implant, onto which a custom restoration is placed. The entire process can take from two to seven months.

  1. The implant is inserted into the jawbone and allowed to heal.
  2. An abutment is attached to the implant, onto which is placed a custom-made restoration.
  3. The finished implant looks and functions like a natural tooth, and helps prevent bone loss in your jaw.

How to care for your denture

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 12:38 am

Just because you may have your denture does not mean that you can ignore your oral health and hygiene. It is still important to seek dental services regularly for evaluating the soft tissues and to examine the denture for proper fit, comfort, and function.

your denture

Daily cleaning of your denture is necessary to prevent build-up of plaque, food, calculus (tartar), and stain which can cause:

  • problems with appearance or esthetics
  • mouth odor
  • irritation to the tissues under the denture
  • infections in the mouth

How do I keep your dentures clean?

  • Rinse the denture under water after meals to remove loose food debris.
  • Brush regularly after each meal, or at least before bed. This removes the plaque and some stains.
  • Brush with water, soap, or a mildly abrasive toothpaste, or denture paste. Scouring powders or other abrasive cleaners should not be used because they scratch the denture. Scratches make the denture more susceptible to collecting debris, plaque and stain.
  • You can use a denture brush or a regular soft toothbrush to clean the denture, but use a separate brush for cleaning any natural teeth you have.
  • Make sure you reach all areas of the denture.
  • The denture can be soaked in a solvent (such as Efferdent, Polident) or a detergent with a chemical action that removes or loosens light stains and deposits. Rinse the denture with water afterwards. Chemical immersions can be done daily or several times a week.
  • Ultrasonic cleaning is done during a dental appointment to remove heavy stain and calculus (tartar).
  • The most effective way to keep your dentures clean is by daily brushing, in combination with soaking the dentures in a chemical solution.

Some helpful hints:

  • When brushing the appliance do not hold it firmly or with pressure as this can break the denture.
  • Clean the denture over a sink half filled with water and place a towel in the sink to act as a cushion in case the denture should drop.
  • Do not soak or rinse the denture in hot water, this can distort the shape and fit of the denture.
  • Never scrape the denture with sharp instruments in an attempt to remove hard deposits. Instead, take it to a dental professional for them to remove the deposits.
  • Never use a hard bristled brush to clean the denture. This can scratch the denture.
  • Make sure to leave your denture out overnight, or out of the mouth for a period of 6 to 8 hours daily. Wearing them at all times without allowing your gums a chance “to breathe” , can result in infections of the soft tissues under the denture.
  • When your dentures are not in your mouth, keep them in water or denture solutions. They need to be kept in a wet environment in order to maintain the proper fit.

Your gums are important too:

Not only do your dentures need maintenance, but care also needs to be given to the tissues under your denture.

  • The gums should be cleaned daily with a soft toothbrush or a washcloth. This removes the plaque and debris on the gums. It also massages and stimulates circulation of tissues.
  • Massage your gums by placing the thumb and index finger over the ridge and use a “press-and-release” stroke.

Remaining natural teeth:

  • It is very important to keep any remaining natural teeth free of plaque.
  • To clean your natural teeth, check out: Brushing and flossing

How do I know my dentures no longer fit?

With age, the jaw bones slowly change. Therefore, dentures that once fit no longer do. You may need to have your dentures re-adjusted or you may need to have a new denture made. If you encounter any of these problems, see your dental professional.

  • problems chewing food with dentures
  • chronic cheek biting
  • difficulty in speech
  • red and inflamed tissues
  • discomfort with wearing the denture
  • cracked corners of your mouth

Burning mouth syndrome

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 12:04 am

Burning mouth syndrome is a painful and often frustrating condition. Some patients compare it to having burned their mouth with hot coffee.

Burning mouth syndrome

The burning sensation may affect the tongue, the roof of the mouth, the gums, the inside of the cheeks and the back of the mouth or throat. The condition sometimes is known as “burning tongue (or lips) syndrome,” “scalded mouth syndrome,” “glossodynia” and “stomatodynia.”

In addition to the burning sensation, other conditions- such as a dry or sore mouth or a tingling or numb sensation throughout the mouth and tongue-may occur. A bitter or metallic taste also may be present. This condition can affect men and women, but it is especially common in women during or after menopause.

WHAT CAUSES BURNING MOUTH SYNDROME?

The exact cause of burning mouth syndrome often is difficult to pinpoint. The disorder has long been linked to a variety of other conditions: menopause, diabetes, nutritional deficiencies, tongue thrusting, disorders of the mouth (oral thrush and dry mouth), acid reflux, cancer therapy (irradiation and chemotherapy) and psychological problems.

Some researchers also have suggested dysfunction in the nerves supplying the mouth and tongue as a possible cause. Strictly speaking, the term “burning mouth syndrome” should be used only when a definite cause has not been found.

Once burning mouth syndrome begins, it may persist for many years. Patients who have it may awaken with no pain only to find that the burning sensation grows progressively worse during the day. They may have difficulty falling asleep. The discomfort and restlessness may cause mood changes, irritability, anxiety and depression.

HOW IS IT TREATED?

Your dentist can confirm the diagnosis and develop an appropriate treatment plan. The dentist will review your medical history and ask you to describe your symptoms.

First, any oral conditions causing the burning sensations should be investigated. For example, if you have dry mouth, your dentist may advise that you drink more fluids or may suggest saliva replacement products that can be purchased at a pharmacy. An oral swab or biopsy may be used to check for thrush, which is a fungal infection; thrush can be treated with oral antifungal medications.

Any irritations caused by sharp or broken teeth or by a removable partial or full denture should be eliminated.

Other simple measures may help. Eliminate mouthwash, chewing gum, tobacco and very acidic liquids (certain fruit juices, soft drinks and coffee) for two weeks to see if there is any improvement.

Consider trying a different brand of toothpaste (lookfor products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance).

Look up the side effects of any medications you are taking (such as those used to treat high blood pressure). You can ask a pharmacist, check a Physicians’ Desk Reference at the library or go to the Internet for this information. If any of your medications are reported to cause a burning sensation in the mouth, ask your physician to consider prescribing a substitute medication. Also, some medications can cause dry mouth, which might aggravate the condition.

If your dentist determines that no oral conditions are causing the burning sensation and the steps listed above do not resolve the problem, disorders such as diabetes, abnormal thyroid conditions, Sjögren’s syndrome (a rheumatological disorder), mineral deficiencies or food allergies should be investigated. This usually involves referral to your family physician and the use of blood tests.

Orthodontic Emergencies

May 21, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 11:58 pm

Many common orthodontic “emergencies” can be handled easily at home. To help you accurately describe an emergency situation to our dentist, use the diagram at the end of this section, which illustrates and names each part of a typical set of braces. A list of supplies to keep on hand is also posted at the bottom of this section.

emergencies

True Orthodontic Emergencies

Trauma to tooth – tooth came out

If a tooth has been knocked out, do not clean off the tooth.

  • Call our dentist immediately to inform them of what has happened.
  • Upon locating the tooth, hold the enamel end of the tooth, not the pointed end/root.
  • Do not rinse the tooth in water. Do not scrub the root. You may remove large debris. If possible, put tooth back in socket where tooth was and hold in place with gauze or washcloth. If it is not possible to replace the tooth in its socket, put the tooth into cup of milk or saline solution, or put the tooth between the cheek and gum. Do not put the tooth in plain water.
  • Apply an ice pack to the affected soft tissue area to reduce swelling
  • Do not let the tooth dry out. A tooth can often be saved if cared for properly and reimplanted within an hour.

Broken tooth

  • Clean the injured area and apply an ice pack to the effected soft tissue area to reduce swelling.
  • Save the tip of the tooth (for possible reattachment) and call your dentist right away.

Piece of the Orthodontic Appliance is Swallowed or Aspirated

If you are able to see the piece, you may carefully attempt to remove it. But do not make the attempt if you would cause the patient harm.

Encourage the patient to remain calm. If the patient is coughing excessively or having difficulty breathing, the piece could have been aspirated (drawn into the lung).

If there is no coughing or difficulty in breathing, and you suspect the piece has been swallowed, call the patient’s orthodontist for advice and instructions.

If you are unable to see the piece and believe it may be have been aspirated, call 911 (or the appropriate emergency number for your area) and the orthodontist immediately. The patient should be taken to an urgent care facility for an x-ray to determine the location of the piece. A physician will have to determine the best way to remove it.

Other Problems

A Bracket is Knocked Off

Brackets are the parts of braces attached to teeth with a special adhesive. They are generally positioned in the center of each tooth. If the bracket is off center and moves along the wire, the adhesive has likely failed. Call your orthodontist, who will determine the course of action.

If the loose bracket has rotated on the wire and is sticking out, attempt to turn it back into its normal position and call our dentist to schedule an appointment to have it reattached. You may wish to put orthodontic wax around the area to minimize the movement of the loose brace. If you are in pain, please call our dentist and inform them of the circumstance. If you are not in pain, this is not a true emergency. Please call the orthodontist at your earliest convenience to schedule an appointment to reattach the brace to the tooth.

Remember, brackets can become loose as a result of chewing on hard, sticky or chewy foods or objects as well as from physical contact from sports or rough housing.

Be sure to wear a protective mouth guard while playing sports!

The Archwire is Poking

If the end of an orthodontic archwire (see diagram) is poking in the back of the mouth, attempt to put wax over the area to protect the cheek. Call our dentist to schedule an appointment and have that clipped. If you are uncomfortable, make sure you inform the orthodontist.

In a situation where the wire is extremely bothersome and the patient will not be able to see the orthodontist immediately, as a last resort, the wire may be clipped with an instrument such as fingernail clippers.

Reduce the possibility of swallowing the snipped piece of wire by using folded tissue or gauze around the area to catch the piece you will remove. Use a pair of sharp clippers and snip off the protruding wire. Relief wax may still be necessary to provide comfort to the irritated area.

“Ligature Wire” is Poking Lip or Cheek

Use a Q-tip or pencil eraser to push the wire (see diagram) so that it is flat against the tooth. If the wire cannot be moved into a comfortable position, cover it with relief wax. (See “Irritation of Cheeks or Lips” below for instructions on applying relief wax.) Make the orthodontist aware of the problem.

Loose Brackets, Wires or Bands

If the braces have come loose in any way, call our dentist to determine appropriate next steps. Save any pieces of your braces that break off and bring them with you to your repair appointment.

Irritation of Lips or Cheeks

Sometimes new braces can be irritating to the mouth. A small amount of orthodontic wax makes an excellent buffer between the braces and lips, cheek or tongue. Simply pinch off a small piece and roll it into a ball the size of a small pea. Flatten the ball and place it completely over the area of the braces causing irritation. If possible, dry off the area first as the wax will stick better. The patient may then eat more comfortably. If the wax is accidentally swallowed it’s not a problem. The wax is harmless.

Mouth Sores

People who have mouth sores during orthodontic treatment may gain relief by applying a small amount of topical anesthetic (such as Orabase or Ora-Gel) directly to the sore area using a cotton swab. Reapply as needed.

Discomfort

It’s normal to have discomfort for three to five days after braces or retainers are adjusted. Although temporary, it can make eating uncomfortable. Encourage soft foods. Have the patient rinse the mouth with warm salt water. Over-the-counter pain relievers, acetaminophen or ibuprofen, may be effective.

Lost Ligature (Rubber or Wire)

Tiny rubber bands known as alastic ligatures (see diagram), are often used to hold the archwire into the bracket or brace. If an alastic ligature is lost, contact the orthodontist, who can advise you whether the patient should be seen.

The same holds true for wire ligatures.

What if the Lip Gets Caught on a Brace?

  • Call our dentist immediately.

Apply ice to the affected area until you have the opportunity to been seen by your orthodontist or family dentist.

I Can’t Open My Mouth

Potential causes – problems with lower jaw joint or swelling around the soft tissues in the mouth.

  • Call our dentist and inform them of your symptoms.

Food Caught Between Teeth

This is not an emergency. It can be resolved with a piece of dental floss. Try tying a small knot in the middle of the floss to help remove the food. Or use an interproximal brush to dislodge food caught between teeth and braces.

Braces

A. Ligature
The archwire is held to each bracket with a ligature, which can be either a tiny elastic or a twisted wire.

B. Archwire
The archwire is tied to all of the brackets and creates force to move teeth into proper alignment.

C. Brackets
Brackets are connected to the bands, or directly bonded on the teeth, and hold the archwire in place.

D. Metal Band
The band is the cemented ring of metal which wraps around the tooth.

E. Elastic Hooks & Rubber Bands
Elastic hooks are used for the attachment of rubber bands, which help move teeth toward their final position.

Supplies

With these supplies on hand, you will be prepared to handle the most common problems with braces.

  • Non-medicated orthodontic relief wax
  • Dental floss
  • Sterile tweezers
  • Small, sharp clippers suitable for cutting wire (such as a fingernail clipper)
  • Q-tips
  • Salt
  • Interproximal brush
  • Non-prescription pain reliever (acetaminophen or ibuprofen or any over-the-counter medication typically used for a headache)
  • Oral topical anesthetic (such as Orabase or Ora-Gel)

Senior Dental Care

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 12:34 am

Good oral dental health is an important part of growing older for our seniors. Unfortunately, many older adults don’t give their overall mouth care the attention it needs. Use the following suggestions to ensure that your mouth stays healthy.

Prevent gum disease – which is the major cause of tooth loss in adults – by brushing and flossing regularly, eating a balanced diet and making regular visits to your dentist.

It may become more difficult to keep your teeth clean and white as you grow older. This is because plaque can build up faster, and in greater amounts, as you age. Keep plaque to a minimum with a fluoride toothpaste recommended by the Dental Association.

Saliva helps keep your mouth healthy. When dryness occurs, it can be the result of several causes, including medications and illness. See your dentist for ways to treat dry mouth.

Changes in your mouth that occur with aging can make cavities a problem. Fluoride is the best defense you have against cavities, reducing the risk by 15 to 35 percent.

Even if you no longer have natural teeth, you should continue to see you dentist regularly. Regular visits are especially important to check for signs of diseases which show symptoms in the mouth, such as diabetes.

Dentures don’t last forever. A recent study has shown that after 11 years, about 80 percent of dentures need to be replaced. Never use a denture adhesive regularly unless advised to by your dentist. If used consistently, denture adhesives can mask infections and cause bone loss in the jaw.

There are several cosmetic procedures available such as bleaching and bonding that can help improve your smile. Ask your dentist about what techniques would be right for you.

If arthritis, stroke, or another medical condition has made it difficult for you to brush or floss, see you dentist for adaptive devices that can help you. These include extenders for toothbrush handles, specially designed floss holders, etc.

Whatever your age, it’s important to keep your mouth clean, healthy and feeling good. With good home preventive care and regular visits to your dentist, changes in your mouth need not cause problems. Make a commitment to your oral health – and keep a smile that will last a lifetime.

Risk factors of having missing teeth

May 20, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 11:27 pm

Have you ever thought that missing teeth may not be such a big deal as long as it’s not visible and nothing bad is happening? You may reason the cost, pain or time may not be worth replacing it. But what many people don’t know is that having one or more missing teeth can cause major problems to your oral and medical health in the long term.

missing teeth

Each tooth is essential to the proper alignment of the bite. All present teeth support one another from shifting as well as the gums and the jawbone. When a tooth is lost and is not replaced with a dental implant or bridge, it causes the teeth next to it to shift and tilt into the empty space. As a result, all other teeth will begin to shift into available spaces. The teeth above or below a gap can also start growing downward (or upward) since they have nothing to chew against and can loosen and eventually fall out. With missing teeth, all remaining teeth will be more susceptible to decay and gum disease. A domino effect occurs that can lead to TMJ with pain and headaches being a common side effect.

Present teeth help support the jawbone by applying pressure when food is being chewed. This provides a stimulus to the bone cells and keeps the bone cells from dissolving. When a tooth root is absent, the bone cells begin to die off. If several or all teeth are missing, the entire jawbone deteriorates and dramatically affects the appearance of the face. This really makes someone look much older than they really are. If you decide get a dental implant at a later time, a bone graft may need to be done to hold the implant since some of the bone may have already dissolved.

The problems from having missing teeth occur very slowly making it difficult to notice whether any change or damage is occurring. Bone loss from one missing tooth can be seen through an X-Ray. Make an appointment as soon as you can to avoid future problems and treat any missing teeth.

Gum Disease

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 12:38 am

Gum Disease

Gum disease is also known as periodontal disease, and is an infection of the gums surrounding your teeth. Gum disease is one of the top reasons for tooth loss in adults, and because it is virtually pain free, many patients do not know they have the disease. During each regular checkup, your dentist will check for signs of periodontal disease by measuring the space between your teeth and gums.

What Causes Gum Disease?

Gum disease is caused by a buildup of plaque (a sticky form of bacteria that forms on the teeth). If the plaque is not removed (by flossing, brushing, and regular dental checkups), it will continue to build up and create toxins that can damage the gums. Periodontal disease forms just below the gum line and creates small pockets that separate the gums from the teeth. Periodontal disease has two stages: gingivitis and periodontitis.

  • Gingivitis — This is the early stage of gum disease, when the gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily. At this stage, the disease is treatable and can usually be eliminated by daily brushing and flossing.
  • Periodontitis — If left untreated, gingivitis will advance into periodontitis, and the gums and bone that support the teeth will become seriously and irreversibly damaged. Gums infected with periodontitis can cause teeth to become loose, fall out, or be removed by a dentist.

Certain factors can increase a patient’s risk of developing periodontal disease, including:

  • Smoking or using chewing tobacco
  • Diabetes
  • Certain types of medication such as steroids, anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, calcium channel blockers, and oral contraceptives
  • Bridges that no longer fit properly
  • Crooked teeth
  • Old fillings
  • Pregnancy

While it is possible to have periodontal disease and not know it, some symptoms can include:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Pus between your teeth and gums
  • Permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

Edson, Hinton, Grande Cache Dental Cleanings

Treating Gum Disease

Treatments for gum disease can vary depending on the severity of each individual case. Typical treatments include:

  • Non-surgical treatments such as at home periodontal trays, and scaling and root planing (deep cleaning)
  • Periodontal surgery and laser gum surgery
  • Dental implants

Preventing Gum Disease

Regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are important for maintaining your health and the health of your smile. You don’t have to lose teeth to periodontal disease, and by practicing good oral hygiene at home, you can significantly reduce your chances of ever getting gum disease. Remember to brush regularly, clean between your teeth, eat a balanced diet, and schedule regular dental visits to help keep your smile healthy.

How to know if sedation dentistry is right for you?

May 19, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 11:02 pm

Consultations may help you determine if sedation dentistry is the right choice for you. You can easily book a consultation with our office, but here is some information to consider before then.

Sedation dentistry

Sedation dentistry may be a good choice if:

· You don’t want to be aware of what’s happening during a procedure and you want to minimize you memory of the dental work

· You do not think you would otherwise get much needed work done because of your own anxiety, discomfort or fear of pain

· You have fear of a specific procedure, and you know that fear would not dissipate with pain control medications

· You have a mental or social disorder that interferes with dental care

Sedation dentistry Foothills Dental may not be a good choice if:

· You dislike relinquishing control or have difficulty trusting others

· You have a fear of drugs or potential side effects

· You worry sedation might interfere with your judgment about dental work

· You believe that you can overcome nerves if your dentist just communicates a bit more and goes slowly

If you’re considering sedation dentistry, be sure to ask some key questions.

IV sedation is one of the most stable forms of anesthesia. But some dental offices may offer a variety of sedation drugs. Be sure to ask about the options before you submit to sedation.

You should also ask:

· If your dentist has had dedicated training in oral sedation

· If your dentist is affiliated with any local hospitals, in case there is a need for emergency care due to a reaction to sedation

· About the risks associated with the sedation planned for you.

You may find it helpful to review this more complete list of questions from the American Dental Association.

Sedation is becoming a more common practice in dental care, and many patients find it relieves anxiety and helps them receive dental work they may have avoided otherwise. It can also be helpful for children who have an intense fear of the dentist; with sedation dentistry at Foothills Dental, a child may have a more relaxed experience in the dental office, preventing long-term anxiety or fear in the future.

 

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#20 - 4 Spruce Ridge Drive, Spruce Grove, AB T7X 4S3 CA
Dr. Mark Southwood Spruce Grove, AB dentist. (780) 962-5538 (780) 962-4485 spruceridgedental@hotmail.ca