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Spruce Ridge Dental Blog

The dental exam–more than just a “checkup”

December 15, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 3:51 pm

Why is a dental exam important?

As you sit in the dentist’s chair looking up at the posters on the ceiling, do you
ever wonder what the dentist is doing? Do you actually know what are they
looking for? It turns out most of us do not.

exam
The dental examination begins with the collection of your complete medical
history. Understanding your medical history can provide the dentist with vital
information on any health condition you may have which can ultimately impact
the success of any dental treatments.

exam
Radiographs (x-rays) are also taken and studied so that the dentist can see things
not seen by the naked eye. Having the visual of the inside of your teeth, the
condition of your roots and areas between your teeth, help the dentist determine
bone loss, root health and the indication of any cysts or growths than may affect
your overall oral health.

exam
Next a full visual scan of the teeth is done, comparing what is seen with what
appears on the x-rays. The dentist checks not only the teeth and gums, but also
other soft tissues. Knowing the condition of the gums and seeing any signs of as
periodontal disease, provides information on the overall health of the supporting
structure (gums) that can lead to loosening of the teeth and potential bone and/or
tooth loss.
The exam continues by checking other areas such as the tongue, roof of the
mouth (palate) and floor of the mouth for any visible signs of inflammation or
bleeding. Looking for signs of white lesions or oral cancer and/or suspicious
growths or blocked salivary glands, are an essential part of this dental exam.
Your dentist will also check the general condition of the bones in the face, jaws
and around the mouth. In doing so, the dentist has a clear picture of the overall
function of your temporomandibular joint (joint that joins your jaw to the skull) and
other areas such as the overall health of your sinus cavity.

Dentists will also examine your neck area, feeling the glands and lymph nodes for
possible signs of inflammation which could be an indicator of other general health
conditions. The glands in the neck area are prominent gateways to the rest of
your general overall health.

exam
The dentist is also looking for many other things such as, cavities, damaged or
missing teeth, restorations in the mouth such as root canals or crowns and the
positioning of the teeth.

exam
Dentists have the opportunity explain what they are doing during the examination
and provide you with a summary of their findings when they are finished. If the
examination reveals a problem that requires treatment, there should be a two-way
discussion on the options available. If your dentist identifies a problem that is
complex or requires specialized treatment; the dentist may refer you to a dental
specialist. Patients, as an active part of your oral health team, are encouraged to
ask questions.

exam
For further information, talk to one of our dentists or go to www.oralhealthalberta.com.

Periodontal Scaling And Root Planing

December 5, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 3:51 am

The objective of scaling & root planning is to remove etiologic agents which cause inflammation to the gingival (gum) tissue and surrounding bone.  Common etiologic agents removed by this conventional periodontal therapy include dental plaque and tartar (calculus).

scaling

These non-surgical procedures which completely cleanse the periodontium, work very effectively for individuals suffering from gingivitis (mild gum inflammation) and moderate/severe periodontal disease.

Reasons for scaling and root planing

Scaling and root planning can be used both as a preventative measure and as a stand-alone treatment.  These procedures are performed as a preventative measure for a periodontitis sufferer.

Here are some reasons why these dental procedures may be necessary:

  • Disease prevention – The oral bacteria which cause periodontal infections can travel via the bloodstream to other parts of the body.  Research has shown that lung infections and heart disease have been linked to periodontal bacteria.  Scaling and root planing remove bacteria and halts periodontal disease from progressing, thus preventing the bacteria from traveling to other parts of the body.
  • Tooth protection – When gum pockets exceed 3mm in depth, there is a greater risk of periodontal disease.  As pockets deepen, they tend to house more colonies of dangerous bacteria.  Eventually, a chronic inflammatory response by the body begins to destroy gingival and bone tissue which may lead to tooth loss.  Periodontal disease is the number one cause of tooth loss in the developed world.
  • Aesthetic effects – Scaling and root planing help remove tartar and plaque from the teeth and below the gumline.  As an added bonus, if superficial stains are present on the teeth, they will be removed in the process of the scaling and root planning procedure.
  • Better breath – One of the most common signs of periodontal disease is halitosis (bad breath).  Food particles and bacteria can cause a persistent bad odor in the oral cavity which is alleviated with cleaning procedures such as scaling and root planing.

What do scaling and root planing treatments involve?

Scaling and root planing treatments are only performed after a thorough examination of the mouth.  The dentist will take X-rays, conduct visual examinations and make a diagnosis before recommending or beginning these procedures.

Depending on the current condition of the gums, the amount of calculus (tartar) present, the depth of the pockets and the progression of the periodontitis, local anesthetic may be used.

Scaling – This procedure is usually performed with special dental instruments and may include an ultrasonic scaling tool.  The scaling tool removes calculus and plaque from the surface of the crown and root surfaces.  In many cases, the scaling tool includes an irrigation process that can also be used to deliver an antimicrobial agent below the gums that can help reduce oral bacteria.

Root Planing – This procedure is a specific treatment which serves to remove cementum and surface dentin that is embedded with unwanted microorganisms, toxins and tartar.  The root of the tooth is literally smoothed in order to promote good healing. Having clean, smooth root surfaces helps bacteria from easily colonizing in future.

Following these deep cleaning procedures, the gum pockets may be treated with antibiotics.  This will soothe irritation and help the gum tissues to heal quickly.

During the next appointment, the dentist or hygienist will thoroughly examine the gums again to see how well the pockets have healed.  If the gum pockets still measure more than 3mm in depth, additional and more intensive treatments may be recommended.

 

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay: Signs, Signals and Prevention

December 2, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 8:14 pm

The joy of your new baby comes with an added responsibility. Your little bundle of light requires some basic needs to keep him healthy and happy.

baby

We would like to help new parents understand the importance of good dental health from infancy. Your little one’s baby teeth aren’t permanent, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t important.

What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Baby bottle tooth decay is the phrase dentists use to describe cavities and tooth decay in infant patients. You may also hear a dentist refer to it as early childhood caries. Many infants with baby bottle tooth decay develop decay in the upper front teeth.

Bottles and pacifiers can leave sugar and residue in your child’s mouth, which can advance into tooth decay. Your baby could be at risk for baby bottle tooth decay if she has frequent and lengthy exposure to sugar. Baby bottle tooth decay can also pass from a caregiver to the child. You should refrain from cleaning your child’s spoon, bottle nipple or pacifier with your own mouth, as your saliva could pass bacteria to your baby.

Why Are Baby Teeth Important?

Baby teeth hold the places for your child’s permanent teeth, and they also affect her smile, her speech and her eating habits.

Straight baby teeth will hopefully shed normally and yield room for a straight set of permanent teeth. Naturally straight teeth will prevent your child from needing braces or Invisalign treatment in the future. Straight teeth help self-image, and they are also easier to keep clean than crooked teeth.

How Can I Keep My Child’s Teeth Decay-Free?

Schedule a visit with your dentist before your baby’s first birthday. You may have been told to wait until your child is between 3 and 5, or to wait until all his baby teeth have erupted. The Canadian Dental Association recommends parents schedule their child’s first dental visit by the time she turns 1. Pediatric dentists are equipped to treat infant patients, and they’ll evaluate your baby’s mouth for signs of baby bottle tooth decay. Continue routine dental visits so your dentist can monitor changes to your child’s oral health.

You should also practice good oral hygiene habits with your baby. Don’t leave your baby with a bottle at naptime or bedtime. Wipe his gums with a clean, damp cloth after every bottle or breast-feeding session. You may prefer to use a clean gauze pad instead of a cloth. Only use bottles for milk, breast milk or formula. A bottle of sugar water, soft drinks or juice can keep sugars lingering in your baby’s mouth, and sugar helps breed bacteria and acid. These by-products lead to tooth decay. If your baby takes a pacifier, keep her pacifier clean, and never dip it in sugar or honey before giving it to her. You should brush your baby’s teeth once her first tooth has poked through the gums. You don’t need toothpaste yet; a damp infant-sized toothbrush or finger brush will work fine. At the 2-year mark you can start using small amounts of fluoride toothpaste, ensuring your baby isn’t swallowing any toothpaste.

How Can I Keep My Young Child’s Teeth Decay-Free?

Help your child maintain a healthy diet by promoting healthy foods and limiting sugar intake. Bring your little one to the dentist every six months, and inquire about dental sealants to keep your child’s erupted molars decay-free. Monitor your child’s brushing and flossing habits to make sure he’s brushing for two-minute intervals and to make sure he’s spitting out toothpaste completely. Your child will probably have enough maturity and motor function to be in charge of his own oral health when he’s around 6 or 7.

sealants

December 1, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 9:45 pm

Sealants are thin layers of resin that are placed on the pits, fissures, and grooves of molars to prevent decay on these surfaces.

sealants

 

The majority of decay on back teeth starts in the grooves and pits of chewing surfaces, especially during the first few years after their eruption. Sealing these surfaces with composite resins prevents this kind of decay.

More than 75% of dental decay begins in these deep grooves and pits.  Teeth with these deep grooves and pits are hard to clean and are very susceptible to decay.  A sealant protects the tooth by sealing deep grooves and pits, creating a smooth, easy to clean surface.

Sealants can protect teeth from decay for many years, but need to be checked for wear and chipping at regular dental visits.  Once a sealant leaks, they can no longer seal bacteria out and need to be replaced.

Sealants are one of the most effective methods of preventing decay on the surfaces where they are placed. Although it is still a possibility that decay may develop on surfaces in between teeth, sealants significantly reduce the overall chance of having cavities.  Keep in mind that sealants do not 100% prevent caries and that is why they work most effectively when combined with regular flossing and brushing at home, and regular visits to the dentist’s office for cleaning, fluoride treatment and regular check ups to monitor the sealants and catch decay early.

We are a full service dental office for children and adults.

The Top 10 Reasons to Treat Gum Disease

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 7:23 pm

Gum disease can affect your overall body since bacteria can travel from the gums in the blood circulation to the rest of the body.  We knows how important it is to treat signs of gum disease early. Gum disease is detrimental to your tooth and gum health, and it can cost you permanent teeth if left untreated. At every regular teeth cleaning, our Dentists screen patients for gum disease. In its early stages, it can be eradicated.

Gum disease

Here are the top 10 reasons to treat gum disease:

  1. To Avoid Tooth Loss

Gum disease is the main cause of adult tooth loss. Tooth loss is harmful to your bite, your bone health and your self-esteem. If you treat gum disease early enough, you can thwart tooth loss and protect your smile.

  1. To Avoid Gum Recession

Gingivitis often causes your gums to pull away from your teeth. The recession forms pockets where bacteria gathers and grows. Treat gum disease and keep your gums healthy, strong and prominent.

  1. To Reduce Hospital Visits

Gingivitis, especially in advanced stages, can cause severe pain, which may lead you to visit the emergency room more often. Studies show that treating gum disease lowers your ER visits and medical costs.

  1. To Reduce Heart Disease Risk

Gingivitis has been linked to respiratory disease, diabetes and even some types of cancer. It has also been heavily linked to heart disease. Untreated Gingivitis can heighten your risk of heart attack, stroke and high blood pressure.

  1. To Avoid Bone Deterioration

Severe Ginvivitis causes tooth loss, and tooth loss causes the jawbone to deteriorate. The bone will weaken when the tooth it supports is lost. The deterioration can spread out and weaken other parts of your jaw.

  1. To Preserve Your Bite

Losing one or more teeth to Gingivitis can be avoided. When you lose a tooth, your bite changes. Your teeth may fit together differently, and you may have trouble chewing food. You could even experience migraines or TMJ problems from a destabilized bite.

  1. To Keep Your Gums Healthy

Your gums are the foundation of your smile. Healthy teeth come from healthy gums, and strong gums will hold your teeth firmly in place. Healthy gums don’t bleed, don’t recede and don’t cause you pain.

  1. To Control the Infection

Gingivitis is simply an infection. Bacteria and plaque have caused gum recession and maybe even tooth loss. The infection, if left untreated, could even spread to your bloodstream. You should treat gum disease to control and remove the infection from your body.

  1. To Avoid Loosened Teeth

Before a tooth is lost completely, it will grow loose. A loose permanent tooth will feel much like a loose baby tooth, except this is a tooth you’re supposed to keep forever. Treating gum disease will strengthen your gums and strengthen their bonds with your teeth.

  1. To Reduce Associated Pain and Discomfort

Gingivitis often causes bleeding, tender gums. You may not brush and floss regularly because of the pain, or you may avoid eating when the pain is intense. Treating gum disease will reduce your pain and restore your gums to their previous good health.

We want to help treat your gum disease so you can enjoy a lifetime of healthy smiles.

Dental X-Rays

November 30, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 11:41 pm

Dental radiographs (x-rays) are essential, preventative, diagnostic tools that provide valuable information not visible during a regular dental exam.  Dentists and dental hygienists use this information to safely and accurately detect hidden dental abnormalities and complete an accurate treatment plan.  Without x-rays, problem areas may go undetected.

x-rays

Dental x-rays may reveal:

  • Abscesses or cysts.
  • Bone loss.
  • Cancerous and non-cancerous tumors.
  • Decay between the teeth.
  • Developmental abnormalities.
  • Poor tooth and root positions.
  • Problems inside a tooth or below the gum line.

Detecting and treating dental problems at an early stage can save you time, money, unnecessary discomfort, and your teeth!

Are dental x-rays safe?

We are all exposed to natural radiation in our environment.  The amount of radiation exposure from a full mouth series of x-rays is equal to the amount a person receives in a single day from natural sources.

Dental radiographs produce a low level of radiation and are considered safe.  Dentists take necessary precautions to limit the patient’s exposure to radiation when taking dental radiographs.  These precautions include using lead apron shields to protect the body and using modern, fast film that cuts down the exposure time of each x-ray.  Digital radiographs is another good way to reduce the exposure with either cavity detection films or panoramic views.

How often should dental x-rays be taken?

The need for dental radiographs depends on each patient’s individual dental health needs and conditions.  Your dentist and dental hygienist will recommend necessary radiographs based on the review of your medical and dental history, dental exam, signs and symptoms, age consideration, and risk for disease.

Bite-wing x-rays (top and bottom teeth biting together) are decay detecting radiographs which are recommended once or twice a year to detect new dental problems depending on your own particular needs.  If you are being monitored for early cavities (incipient decay) then annual bite-wings are recommended to ensure that necessary timely treatment is provided if these cavities do come bigger and enter into the dentin (inside) of the tooth.

Periapical radiographs are taken when a view of the entire tooth is needed.  This allows our dentists to rule out infection, cysts, tumors or other pathology underneath the gums.

Dental bridges

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 3:34 pm

A dental bridge, otherwise known as a fixed partial denture, is a prosthesis used to replace missing teeth and is not removable by the patient. A prosthesis that is removable by the patient is called a removable partial denture.

Dental bridges

A dental bridge is fabricated by reducing the teeth on either side of the missing tooth or teeth by a preparation pattern determined by the location of the teeth and by the material from which the bridge is fabricated. In other words the abutment teeth are reduced in size to accommodate the material to be used to restore the size and shape of the original teeth in a correct alignment and contact with the opposing teeth.

The materials used for the bridge include gold, porcelain fused to metal, or in the correct situation porcelain alone. The amount and type of reduction done to the abutment teeth varies slightly with the different materials used. The recipient of such a bridge must be careful to clean well under this prosthesis.

When restoring an edentulous space with a fixed partial denture that will crown the teeth adjacent to the space and bridge the gap with a pontic, or “dummy tooth”, the restoration is referred to as a bridge. Besides all of the preceding information that concerns single-unit crowns, bridges possess a few additional considerations when it comes to case selection and treatment planning, tooth preparation and restoration fabrication.

Case selection and treatment planning

When a single tooth requires a crown, the prosthetic crown will in most instances rest upon whatever tooth structure was originally supporting the crown of the natural tooth. However, when restoring an edentulous area with a bridge, the bridge is almost always restoring more teeth than there are root structures to support. For instance, in the photo at right, the 5-unit bridge will only be supported on three abutment teeth. In order to determine whether or not the abutment teeth will be able to support a bridge without a virtually guaranteed failure due to lack of proper support from the remaining root structures, the dentist should employ Ante’s rule, which states that the roots of the remaining abutment teeth must possess a combined total surface area in three dimensions more than that of the missing root structures that are to be restored with the bridge. When the situation yields a poor prognosis for proper support, double abutments may be required to properly conform to Ante’s rule.

When a posterior tooth that is intended to become an abutment tooth already possesses an intracoronal restoration, it might be in order to make that bridge abutment into an inlay or an onlay, instead of a crown. However, this may concentrate the torque of the masticatory forces onto a less enveloping restoration, thus making the bridge more prone to failure.

In some situations, a cantilever bridge may be constructed to restore an edentulous area that only has adequate teeth for abutments either mesially or distally. This must also conform to Ante’s rule but, because there are only abutments on one side, a modification to the rule must be applied, and these bridges possess double abutments in the majority of cases, and the occlusal surface area of the pontic is generally decreased by making the pontic smaller than the original tooth.

Tooth preparation

As with preparations for single-unit crowns, the preparations for multiple-unit bridges must also possess proper taper to facilitate the insertion of the prosthesis onto the teeth. However, there is an added dimension when it comes to bridges, because the bridge must be able to fit onto the abutment teeth simultaneously. Thus, the taper of the abutment teeth must match in order to properly seat the bridge; this is known as requiring parallelism among the abutments. When this is not possible, due to severe tipping of one of more of the abutments, for example, an attachment may be useful, as in the photo at right, so that one of the abutments may be cemented first, and the other abutment, attached to the pontic, can then be inserted, with an arm on the pontic slipping into a groove on the cemented crown to achieve a span across the edentulous area.

Restoration fabrication

As with single-unit crowns, bridges may be fabricated using the lost-wax technique if the restoration is to be either a multiple-unit FGC or PFM. As mentioned in the paragraph above, there are special considerations when preparing for a multiple-unit restoration in that the relationship between the two or more abutments must be maintained in the restoration; that is, there must be proper parallelism in order for the bridge to be able to seat properly on the margins. Sometimes, the bridge does not seat, but the dentist is unsure whether or not it is only because the spacial relationship of the two or more abutments is incorrect, or whether the abutments do not actually fit the preparations. The only way to determine this would be to section the bridge and try in each abutment by itself. If they all fit individually, it must have simply been that the spacial relationship was incorrect, and the abutment that was sectioned from the pontic must now be reattached to the pontic according to the newly confirmed spacial relationship. This is accomplished with a solder index.

The proximal surfaces of the sectioned units (that is, the adjacent surfaces of the metal at the cut) are roughened and the relationship is preserved with a material that will hold onto both sides, such as GC pattern resin. With the two bridge abutments individually seated on their prepared abutment teeth, the resin is applied to the location of the sectioning to re-establish a proper spacial relationship between the two pieces. This can then be sent to the lab where the two pieces will be soldered and returned for another try-in or final cementation.

 

Brushing and Flossing

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 2:35 am

The importance of brushing:

The single best way to remove harmful plaque (a thin, sticky film of bacteria) from teeth and gums is to brush teeth regularly and properly.

What is the proper technique for teeth brushing?

Because every mouth is different, there is more than one technique of brushing that has proven to be effective. Deciding which technique is most appropriate for you depend largely on your teeth position and gum condition. Consult your dentist to determine which brushing technique is most appropriate for your mouth.

Generally, most dentists recommend a circular technique for brushing. This includes brushing only a small group of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth. The importance of maintaining a circular or elliptical motion is emphasized as using a back and forth motion may cause the following:

  • a receded gum surface
  • an exposed and tender root surface
  • a wearing down of the gum line

Instead, dentists recommend the following method:

Step 1: Place the toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle.

Step 2: Gently brush teeth only a small group of teeth at a time (in a circular or elliptical motion) until the entire mouth is covered.

Step 3: Brush the outside of the teeth, inside of the teeth, the chewing surfaces, and in between each tooth.

Step 4: Gently brush the tongue to remove bacteria and freshen breath.

Step 5: Repeat steps 1 through 4 at least twice daily, especially after meals and snacks.

What type of toothbrush should be used?

A toothbrush head should be small, about 1 inch by 1/2 inch, and should have a handle suitable for firm grasping. The bristles of the brush should be soft, nylon, and rounded at the ends. This helps ensure that the brush bristles are reaching the spaces between the teeth as well as the surface. Some brushes are too abrasive and can wear down the enamel on teeth. Thus, in most cases, medium and hard bristles are not recommended.

How often is brushing necessary?

Generally, brushing is recommended twice a day for at least three to four minutes each time. Patients generally think they are brushing long enough, when, in fact, most people spend less than one minute brushing. In addition, it is generally better to brush 3 to 4 minutes twice a day instead of brushing quickly five or more times throughout the day.

Dentists advise brushing your teeth during the day while at work, school, or play. Keeping a toothbrush handy, in your desk or backpack, increases the chances that you will brush during the day.

What is toothpaste?

Also called dentifrice, toothpaste is comprised of the following cleaning ingredients (stated in approximate percentages):

  • humectant and water – 75 percent
  • abrasive – 20 percent
  • foaming and flavoring agents – 2 percent
  • pH buffers – 2 percent
  • coloring agents, binders, and opacifiers – 1.5 percent
  • fluoride – .24 percent

Facts about toothpaste:

Brushing with toothpaste (particularly toothpaste with fluoride) helps to accomplish the following:

  • remove plaque
  • resist decay
  • promote remineralization
  • clean and polish teeth
  • remove teeth stains
  • freshen breath

Brushing

Which type of toothpaste is best?

Fluoride is the most crucial ingredient in toothpaste. As long as the toothpaste contains fluoride, the brand, nor type (paste, gel, or powder) generally does not matter. All fluoride toothpastes work effectively to fight plaque and cavities, and clean and polish tooth enamel. The brand you choose should bear the ADA (American Dental Association) seal of approval on the container, which means that adequate evidence of safety and efficacy have been demonstrated in controlled, clinical trials.

Some toothpastes offer tartar control pyrophosphates to prevent the build-up of soft calculus deposits on teeth, while others offer whitening formulas to safely remove stains making teeth brighter and shinier. But, contrary to clever advertising and popular belief, fluoride is the true active ingredient that works the hardest to protect your teeth.

Brushing
The importance of brushing:

The single best way to remove harmful plaque (a thin, sticky film of bacteria) from teeth and gums is to brush teeth regularly and properly.

What is the proper technique for teeth brushing?

Because every mouth is different, there is more than one technique of brushing that has proven to be effective. Deciding which technique is most appropriate for you depend largely on your teeth position and gum condition. Consult your dentist to determine which brushing technique is most appropriate for your mouth.

Generally, most dentists recommend a circular technique for brushing. This includes brushing only a small group of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth. The importance of maintaining a circular or elliptical motion is emphasized as using a back and forth motion may cause the following:

  • a receded gum surface
  • an exposed and tender root surface
  • a wearing down of the gum line

Instead, dentists recommend the following method:

Step 1: Place the toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle.

Step 2: Gently brush teeth only a small group of teeth at a time (in a circular or elliptical motion) until the entire mouth is covered.

Step 3: Brush the outside of the teeth, inside of the teeth, the chewing surfaces, and in between each tooth.

Step 4: Gently brush the tongue to remove bacteria and freshen breath.

Step 5: Repeat steps 1 through 4 at least twice daily, especially after meals and snacks.

Brushing

What type of toothbrush should be used?

A toothbrush head should be small, about 1 inch by 1/2 inch, and should have a handle suitable for firm grasping. The bristles of the brush should be soft, nylon, and rounded at the ends. This helps ensure that the brush bristles are reaching the spaces between the teeth as well as the surface. Some brushes are too abrasive and can wear down the enamel on teeth. Thus, in most cases, medium and hard bristles are not recommended.

How often is brushing necessary?

Generally, brushing is recommended twice a day for at least three to four minutes each time. Patients generally think they are brushing long enough, when, in fact, most people spend less than one minute brushing. In addition, it is generally better to brush 3 to 4 minutes twice a day instead of brushing quickly five or more times throughout the day.

Dentists advise brushing your teeth during the day while at work, school, or play. Keeping a toothbrush handy, in your desk or backpack, increases the chances that you will brush during the day.

What is toothpaste?

Also called dentifrice, toothpaste is comprised of the following cleaning ingredients (stated in approximate percentages):

  • humectant and water – 75 percent
  • abrasive – 20 percent
  • foaming and flavoring agents – 2 percent
  • pH buffers – 2 percent
  • coloring agents, binders, and opacifiers – 1.5 percent
  • fluoride – .24 percent

Facts about toothpaste:

Brushing with toothpaste (particularly toothpaste with fluoride) helps to accomplish the following:

  • remove plaque
  • resist decay
  • promote remineralization
  • clean and polish teeth
  • remove teeth stains
  • freshen breath


Which type of toothpaste is best?

Fluoride is the most crucial ingredient in toothpaste. As long as the toothpaste contains fluoride, the brand, nor type (paste, gel, or powder) generally does not matter. All fluoride toothpastes work effectively to fight plaque and cavities, and clean and polish tooth enamel. The brand you choose should bear the ADA (American Dental Association) seal of approval on the container, which means that adequate evidence of safety and efficacy have been demonstrated in controlled, clinical trials.

Some toothpastes offer tartar control pyrophosphates to prevent the build-up of soft calculus deposits on teeth, while others offer whitening formulas to safely remove stains making teeth brighter and shinier. But, contrary to clever advertising and popular belief, fluoride is the true active ingredient that works the hardest to protect your teeth.

 

Dental Implants

November 29, 2019

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 8:31 pm

Dental implants can last a very long time with proper placement and diligent patient maintenance. A dental implant is an artificial tooth root that is placed into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge. Dental implants are an ideal option for people in good general oral health who have lost a tooth or teeth due to periodontal disease, an injury, or some other reason. Dental implants are so natural-looking and feel like your own teeth.

dental implant

Under proper conditions and diligent patient maintenance, implants can last a lifetime. Dental implants are intimately connected with the gum tissues and underlying bone in the mouth. Since dentists are the dental experts who specialize in precisely these areas, they are ideal members of your dental implant team. Not only do dentists have experience working with other dental professionals, they also have the special knowledge, training and facilities that you need to have teeth that look and feel just like your own.

dental implant dental implants replacing missing upper teeth to improve function and smile

Our dentists will consult with you to determine where and how your implant should be placed. Depending on your specific condition and the type of implant chosen, we will create a treatment plan tailored to meet your needs.

Implant Overdentures

Do you avoid foods like steak and apples because of uncomfortable dentures? Do you wish you could eat, smile, and speak with confidence again? Implant overdentures may be the solution for you. With implant overdentures, Dr. Andrew Madej and Dr. William Vu anchor the denture in place with strategically-placed dental implants. After the procedure, your dentures will no longer slip or click, and you can eat a healthy diet of hard-to-chew-foods. Implants will also stimulate jawbone growth and help fill out the facial profile for a more youthful appearance.

What are the Uses of Dental Implants?

  • Replace single or multiple teeth without affecting natural teeth.
  • Support a bridge and eliminate the need for a removable partial denture.
  • Provide support for a denture, making it more secure and comfortable.

dental implant

Advantages of Dental Implants Over Dentures or a Bridge

Every way you look at it, dental implants are a better solution to the problem of missing teeth.

Esthetic  Dental implants look and feel natural. Since dental implants integrate into the structure of your bone, they help prevent bone loss and gum recession which may be caused by bridgework and dentures.

Save Natural Teeth  With the placement of dental implants, your natural teeth do not need to be ground down for a bridge. This preserves your natural teeth which is the goal of modern dentistry,

Confidence and Reliability  Dental implants will improve your smile, function and confidence as the restoration would be fixed on your implant. So you don’t have to worry about it getting loose while you are talking or eating. The success rates of implants are high and are a great option for replacing missing teeth.

dental implant

Are you a good candidate for dental implants?

  • You are in reasonably good general health and your periodontal health is stable.
  • Your jaw must have enough bone to support the implant. Bone volume can be increased with procedures like bone grafts and sinus elevation surgery.
  • There must be enough space to place the tooth over the implant.
  • You must understand what the treatment can offer.
  • You cannot wear your denture or chew well with your denture because they are loose, cause pain or are embarrassing.
  • You have loose or uncomfortable dentures and want to secure your denture.

Replacing a Single Tooth

Even a single missing tooth can have a huge impact on your overall oral health, causing remaining teeth to shift and contributing to decay and gum disease. Dr. Andrew Madej and Dr. William Vu can restore the tooth to its original form with a dental implant, which is the only tooth-replacement option that replaces the tooth, as well as the tooth’s root. A single titanium post anchored in the jawbone serves as the tooth’s root, and a custom-designed crown replaces the portion that shows when you smile. Implant-supported crowns look and feel natural, and they help prevent the jawbone deterioration that accompanies tooth loss.

dental implant

What are the advantages of a single-tooth implant over a bridge?

A dental implant provides several advantages over other tooth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like a natural tooth, a dental implant replaces a single tooth without sacrificing the health of neighboring teeth. The other common treatment for the loss of a single tooth, a tooth-supported fixed bridge, requires that adjacent teeth be ground down to support the cemented bridge.

Because a dental implant will replace your tooth root, the bone is better preserved. With a bridge, some of the bone that previously surrounded the tooth begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, a single implant can be more esthetic and easier to keep clean than a bridge. Gums can recede around a bridge, leaving a visible defect when the metal base or collar of the bridge becomes exposed. Resorbed bone beneath the bridge can lead to an unattractive smile. And, the cement holding the bridge in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay the teeth that anchor the bridge.

Replacing Several Teeth

If you are missing several teeth, implant-supported bridges can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported bridges over fixed bridges or removable partial dentures?

Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported bridges replace teeth without support from adjacent natural teeth. Other common treatments for the loss of several teeth, such as fixed bridges or removable partial dentures, are dependent on support from adjacent teeth.

In addition, because implant-supported bridges will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth root may begin to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants are esthetic, functional and comfortable. Gums and bone can recede around a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, leaving a visible defect. Resorbed bone beneath bridges or removable partial dentures can lead to a collapsed, unattractive smile. The cement holding bridges in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay teeth that anchor the bridge. In addition, removable partial dentures can move around in the mouth and reduce your ability to eat certain foods.

Implant Bridge

How will the implants be placed?
The implants are placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These small metal posts, called abutments, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. We will advise you on which system is best for you.

Finally, replacement teeth, or bridges, will be created for you and attached to the abutments. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

Replacing All of Your Teeth With Implants

If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported full bridges and implant-supported dentures over conventional dentures?
Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity.

In addition, because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants can be more esthetic and easier to maintain than conventional dentures. The loss of bone that accompanies conventional dentures leads to recession of the jawbone and a collapsed, unattractive smile. Conventional dentures make it difficult to eat certain foods.

How will the implants be placed?
The first step is to place the implants into your jaw. Then, over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors for your artificial teeth. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These small metal posts, called abutments, along with various connecting devices that allow multiple crowns to attach to the implants, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your dentist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Depending upon the number of implants placed, the connecting device that will hold your new teeth can be tightened down on the implant, or it may be a clipped to a bar or a round ball anchor to which a denture snaps on and off.

Finally, full bridges or full dentures will be created for you and attached to your implants or the connecting device. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

Implant Overdentures with Implants

Do you avoid foods like steak and apples because of uncomfortable dentures? Do you wish you could eat, smile, and speak with confidence again? Implant overdentures may be the solution for you. With implant overdentures, Dr. Andrew Madej and Dr. William Vu anchor the denture in place with strategically-placed dental implants. After the procedure, your dentures will no longer slip or click, and you can eat a healthy diet of hard-to-chew-foods. Implants will also stimulate jawbone growth and help fill out the facial profile for a more youthful appearance.

Sinus Augmentation

A key to implant success is the quantity and quality of the bone where the implant is to be placed. The upper back jaw has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus. If you’ve lost bone in that area due to reasons such as periodontal disease or tooth loss, you may be left without enough bone to place implants.

Sinus augmentation can help correct this problem by raising the sinus floor and developing bone for the placement of dental implants. Several techniques can be used to raise the sinus and allow for new bone to form. In one common technique, an incision is made to expose the bone. Then a small circle is cut into the bone. This bony piece is lifted into the sinus cavity, much like a trap door, and the space underneath is filled with bone graft material. We will explain your options for graft materials, which can regenerate lost bone and tissue.

Finally, the incision is closed and healing is allowed to take place. Depending on your individual needs, the bone usually will be allowed to develop for about four to 12 months before implants can be placed. After the implants are placed, an additional healing period is required. In some cases, the implant can be placed at the same time the sinus is augmented.

Sinus augmentation has been shown to greatly increase your chances for successful implants that can last for years to come. Many patients experience minimal discomfort during this procedure.

Ridge Modification

Deformities in the upper or lower jaw can leave you with inadequate bone in which to place dental implants. This defect may have been caused by periodontal disease, wearing dentures, developmental defects, injury or trauma. Not only does this deformity cause problems in placing the implant, it can also cause an unattractive indentation in the jaw line near the missing teeth that may be difficult to clean and maintain.

To correct the problem, the gum is lifted away from the ridge to expose the bony defect. The defect is then filled with bone or bone substitute to build up the ridge. We will tell you about your options for graft materials, which can help to regenerate lost bone and tissue.

Finally, the incision is closed and healing is allowed to take place. Depending on your individual needs, the bone usually will be allowed to develop for about four to 12 months before implants can be placed. In some cases, the implant can be placed at the same time the ridge is modified.

Ridge modification has been shown to greatly improve appearance and increase your chances for successful implants that can last for years to come. Ridge modification can enhance your restorative success both esthetically and functionally.

Sportguards and Mouthguards

Filed under: Uncategorized — Spruce Ridge Dental @ 3:26 am

 

Why is a mouthguard important?

When a sport mouthguard is worn (and fits properly) it helps provide protection for the hard (teeth and jaw) and soft (lips, cheeks, gums) tissues of the mouth, by absorbing and redistributing the forces generated by traumatic blows.

mouthguard

Why a “Custom” sports guard?

Custom sport mouthguards are typically regarded as the most protective and comfortable type of guard. Therefore, the athlete is more likely to wear their sports guard. Custom sport guards only fit the athlete it was made for and they are still able to speak quite clearly.

Why not a “boil and bite” or generic sports guard?

Typically they are uncomfortable, flop around in the mouth, and you must clench to hold them in place. Often you see athletes with their sport guards half in, half out of their mouths.

What sports should require a sports mouthguard?

Any sport where player contact is commom.The following would be considered a contact sport. Football, boxing, ice hockey, roller hockey, lacrosse, field hockey, rugby, soccer, basketball, water polo, martial arts and wrestling.

Are there any other sports where one requires a sport mouthguard?

Anyone participating in skateboarding, baseball, racquetball, volleyball, tennis, gymnastics and skiing are all at risk for injury and therefore should wear a sports guard.

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#20 - 4 Spruce Ridge Drive, Spruce Grove, AB T7X 4S3 CA
Dr. Mark Southwood Spruce Grove, AB dentist. (780) 962-5538 (780) 962-4485 spruceridgedental@hotmail.ca